Citizen Indigenous || Radcliffe Institute

“Leading members from the Oneida Nation, Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and United Houma Nation of Louisiana discuss vital issues of tribal citizenship in Indian Country. By exploring topics such as constitutional reform, tribal enrollment, blood quantum, and descendancy, the speakers discuss the many different ways Native tribes and nations define, grant, and express indigenous citizenship.”

Turtle Talk

Here:

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Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology Occasional Papers

A Native’s Perspective on Trends in Contemporary Archaeology by John N. Low is available in the MCJA Occasional Paper Number 2 – Spring 2018

Cover MAC-Occasional-Papers

You can download the pdf here:
Encounters, Exchange, Entanglements: Current Perspectives on Intercultural Interactions throughout the Western Great Lakes

I Will be Presenting at The 2018 TEDNA Regional Conference on Education Sovereignty and Data on April 11th, 2018

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The 2018 TEDNA Regional Conference on Education Sovereignty and Data

TEDNA 2018

 Description

The Tribal Education Departments National Assembly (TEDNA) through collaboration with the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi is hosting the 2018 TEDNA Regional Conference on Education Sovereignty and Data, will be held from April 10-11th, and on the 12th is the TEDNA Annual Board meeting and Michigan Tribal Education Directors meeting, at New Buffalo, Michigan. The conference is a unique chance to meet different leaders and practitioners in the field of education sovereignty focused on: data collection, implementation, and sharing innovative practices. All attendees will examine research and development of how Tribal Education Departments organize and analyze their education data. Our goal is that every attendee will walk away with policy insights, identification of critical challenges, and foster a solution-based collaboration to improve data quality and result in an increased capacity over tribal education data.

Date and Time

Tue, Apr 10, 2018, 8:00 AM –

Thu, Apr 12, 2018, 5:00 PM EDT

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Location

Silver Creek Event Center
Four Winds Casino Resort11111 Wilson Rd
New Buffalo, MI 49117

Cost

$25 – $450

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Columbus Dispatch Write Up: Exhibit: Polynesian tapa making showcased in display at OSU-Newark

Exhibit: Polynesian tapa making showcased in display at OSU-Newark

Dispatch article on Tapas Exhibit 12.10.17 2_Page_1

Dispatch article on Tapas Exhibit 12.10.17_Page_2

The Power of Place The Potawatomi, Chicago and Wheaton: Friday, December 8th, 4:00 pm, Wheaton College

The Power of Place

Working Hard During National Native American Heritage Month

I had the honor to be the keynote speaker for National Native American Heritage Month celebrations at Wright State University, the Ohio National Guard, and Defiance College this month. At each venue I was impressed with the desire of the audiences to learn more about the indigenous peoples of the United States.

2017-AIHM-program

I was also interviewed by Michigan Public Radio for their program “Stateside with Cynthia Canty.”  broadcast  in Ann Arbor (the statewide NPR affiliate). Stateside includes a  Michigan History Center (MHC) production of a weekly Michigan History segment. With November being Native American History month, the folks at the Michigan History Center and the station wanted to do a couple of history segments focusing on Native Michiganders. I joined Cynthia and the MHC’s Sandra Clark to discuss the story of Leopold Pokagon and how decisions he made in the 1800s still impact lives today. Here is a link to the program:

Leopold Pokagon: How a band of Potawatomi converted to Catholicism and avoided removal

I also had the opportunity to participate in the symposium “Collaborative Curation of North American Human Remains.” at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago this month. Participants included museum professional and tribal nation representatives, as well as those like myself who have written about and/or engaged in repatriation efforts. While it was obvious to me that there is much work to yet be done to get everyone on the same page, I was heartened by the sincere effort that everyone made to listen to the views and suggestions of others. Special thanks to Helen Robbins from the Field Museum for inviting me!

“The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia” at the Ohio State University – Newark.

It was my honor to co-curate with Marcus Boroughs an exhibit presenting the aesthetic beauty of tapa/ngatu weavings with block printed art reflecting iconic imagery of Oceania. It is quickly obvious that these artistic creations take a community to construct. A sense of connection, tradition, and pride fills the LeFevre Gallery at the Newark campus. The exhibit is free and open to the public until May 1, 2018.

“The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia” comprises original artwork, traditional tapa (beaten bark cloth), photography, film, and ephemera. Exhibition content focuses on artists Dame Robin White (New Zealand) and Ruha Fifita (Tonga), their process and practice in Polynesia.  Collaborating with communities of indigenous women, the artists use traditional methods to produce tapa while also incorporating innovation and contemporary narratives related to the history of Polynesian communities.” (From the prospectus.)

Maori Exhibit BrochureJ