Author Archives: John N. Low

AIQ Review of Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago by John N. Low

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Reviewed Work: Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago by John N. Low
Review by: Robert E. Walls (Notre Dame)
American Indian Quarterly
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Summer 2017), pp. 292-294
Published by: University of Nebraska Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5250/amerindiquar.41.3.0292
Page Count: 3

3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner, Northwestern University, May 7th, 2017

Northwestern University’s Multicultural Student Affairs, in partnership with the Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, has invited me to the 3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner on Sunday, May 7th, from 5pm-7pm. As a founding advisor and inspiration for the creation of NAISA. the student Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, I have been asked to speak briefly at the celebration. The event will be located on the Evanston campus in Scott Hall’s Guild Lounge, 601 University Place.

SP17_NU_3rd Annual Native Community Dinner_flyer

Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium Friday, March 31, 2017

The Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium held Friday, March 31, 2017: Muncie, Indiana.

I was honored to provide a keynote address and was most impressed with the quality of student scholarship at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at BSU! Thank you again to everyone who I had the pleasure to meet at the daylong event!

Lowflyer.BSU

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International Symposium on World Minority Literature: Chengdu, China

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Photo: (l to r) Prof. Xu Xinjian, Prof. Juan Carlos Galeano, Prof. Wen Peihong, Prof. Mark Bender, Prof. John N. Low, Prof. Liu Daxin, Zhang Haibin, Prof. Aku Wuwu (Luo Qingchun), Aniu Muzhi.

International Symposium on World Minority Literature – Chengdu, China

At the conference I gave a presentation  Simon Pokagon – Pokagon Potawatomi: Storyteller & Writer which was very well received. There are 58 ethnic minorities in China and they struggle with many of the same issues (language and cultural preservation, etc.) as my own tribal nation.  My hosts at the conference were wonderful and very kind. It was my first trip to China and I look forward to returning in the future. The opportunities for collaboration and alliance with other indigenous people on a global level is inspiring.

The International Symposium on World Minority Literature was held on the campus of Southwest University for Nationalities (西南民族大学; SWUN), Oct. 29, 2016 in Chengdu, Sichuan.  The sponsoring units were Southwest University for Nationalities and the China Ethnic Literature Society (中国少数民族文学学会). Over 40 speakers delivered papers under the headings of Oral Tradition and World Ethnic Minority Literature, Multiple Narratives and World Ethnic Minority Literature, Cross-ethnic Interaction and World Ethnic Minority Literature, and General Topics.

The chair of the meeting was Prof. Luo Qingchun (aka Aku Wuwu), dean of the Yi College at SWUN. Speakers included Prof. Wang Feng, Vice-chair of China Ethnic Literature Society, Prof. Xu Xinjian of Sichuan University, Ai Lian, Director of Sichuan Provincial Academy of Social Sciences and Secretary General of the association of Literary Critics, Native American scholar John N. Low of The Ohio State University, and others. ~ Mark Bender (The Ohio State University)

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Sustainable Wisdom: Integrating Indigenous Knowhow for Global Flourishing September 11-15, 2016 | University of Notre Dame

Sustainable Wisdom: Integrating Indigenous Knowhow for Global Flourishing

September 11-15, 2016 | University of Notre Dame

Sunday September 11 – 4:00-5:00

History of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi

by Dr. John Low

Sustainable_Wisdom

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Visit to the Olentangy Indian Caverns

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On Saturday, April 30th, the AISO – the American Indian studies club at OSUN – group along with other friends and family ventured to the Olentangy Indian Caverns, just north of Columbus. We talked about power and representation; commodification of culture; Indians as tourist attractions and Midwestern kitsch. Wish it had been a bit warmer but it was very thought provoking. The best surprise – the caves themselves were pretty impressive.

Cave Olentangy 4.30.16

Eighth Generation and Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Release Preview of New Wool Blanket Design

A NEW TRADITION BEGINS: Eighth Generation and Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Release Preview of New Wool Blanket Design

Eighth Generation, the first Native-owned company to offer wool blankets, has released a video preview of their collaborative blanket with the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi (Dowagiac, MI). The Seattle-based small business has been offering wool blankets since October 2015. This groundbreaking project is Eighth Generation’s first collaboration with a tribe, and it demonstrates what is possible when Native people have ownership over all aspects of the development and manufacturing process.

(via A Tribe Called Geek)

(image via the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi)