Category Archives: Academia

NU-NAISA commemorates the 153rd Sand Creek Massacre anniversary (Northwestern University)

NAISA commemorates the 153rd Sand Creek Massacre anniversary

Was an invited speaker to this amazing event. Story linked above.

Meet the Author, John Low, Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians at the Newberry Library, Chicago December 7th

Header-Flyer-Low-Imprints

Thursday, December 7, 2017

6 to 7:30 pm

Ruggles Hall

Free and open to the public. Registration required.

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians has been a part of Chicago since its founding. In very public expressions of indigeneity, they have refused to hide in plain sight or assimilate. Instead, throughout the city’s history, the Pokagon Potawatomi Indians have openly and aggressively expressed their refusal to be marginalized or forgotten—and in doing so, they have contributed to the fabric and history of the city.

Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago examines the ways some Pokagon Potawatomi tribal members have maintained a distinct Native identity, their rejection of assimilation into the mainstream, and their desire for inclusion in the larger contemporary society without forfeiting their “Indianness.” Mindful that contact is never a one-way street, Dr. Low also examines the ways in which experiences in Chicago have influenced the Pokagon Potawatomi. Imprints continues the recent scholarship on the urban Indian experience before as well as after World War II.

After his talk, Dr. Low will sign copies of the book. Imprints will be available in the Newberry Bookstore; your purchase helps to support the Newberry Library and this program’s featured author.

Download a PDF flyer for this event to post and distribute.

John N. Low (Pokagon Potawatomi) is Assistant Professor of Comparative Studies at the Ohio State University Newark, where his research and teaching encompass many aspects of American Indian histories, literatures, and cultures. He has previously served as Executive Director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, as a member of the Advisory Committee for the Indians of the Midwest Project at the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry Library, and on the State of Ohio Cemetery Law Task Force. He continues to serve as a member of his tribe’s Traditions & Repatriation Committee.

3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner, Northwestern University, May 7th, 2017

Northwestern University’s Multicultural Student Affairs, in partnership with the Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, has invited me to the 3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner on Sunday, May 7th, from 5pm-7pm. As a founding advisor and inspiration for the creation of NAISA. the student Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, I have been asked to speak briefly at the celebration. The event will be located on the Evanston campus in Scott Hall’s Guild Lounge, 601 University Place.

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Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium Friday, March 31, 2017

The Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium held Friday, March 31, 2017: Muncie, Indiana.

I was honored to provide a keynote address and was most impressed with the quality of student scholarship at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at BSU! Thank you again to everyone who I had the pleasure to meet at the daylong event!

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International Symposium on World Minority Literature: Chengdu, China

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Photo: (l to r) Prof. Xu Xinjian, Prof. Juan Carlos Galeano, Prof. Wen Peihong, Prof. Mark Bender, Prof. John N. Low, Prof. Liu Daxin, Zhang Haibin, Prof. Aku Wuwu (Luo Qingchun), Aniu Muzhi.

International Symposium on World Minority Literature – Chengdu, China

At the conference I gave a presentation  Simon Pokagon – Pokagon Potawatomi: Storyteller & Writer which was very well received. There are 58 ethnic minorities in China and they struggle with many of the same issues (language and cultural preservation, etc.) as my own tribal nation.  My hosts at the conference were wonderful and very kind. It was my first trip to China and I look forward to returning in the future. The opportunities for collaboration and alliance with other indigenous people on a global level is inspiring.

The International Symposium on World Minority Literature was held on the campus of Southwest University for Nationalities (西南民族大学; SWUN), Oct. 29, 2016 in Chengdu, Sichuan.  The sponsoring units were Southwest University for Nationalities and the China Ethnic Literature Society (中国少数民族文学学会). Over 40 speakers delivered papers under the headings of Oral Tradition and World Ethnic Minority Literature, Multiple Narratives and World Ethnic Minority Literature, Cross-ethnic Interaction and World Ethnic Minority Literature, and General Topics.

The chair of the meeting was Prof. Luo Qingchun (aka Aku Wuwu), dean of the Yi College at SWUN. Speakers included Prof. Wang Feng, Vice-chair of China Ethnic Literature Society, Prof. Xu Xinjian of Sichuan University, Ai Lian, Director of Sichuan Provincial Academy of Social Sciences and Secretary General of the association of Literary Critics, Native American scholar John N. Low of The Ohio State University, and others. ~ Mark Bender (The Ohio State University)

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Sustainable Wisdom: Integrating Indigenous Knowhow for Global Flourishing September 11-15, 2016 | University of Notre Dame

Sustainable Wisdom: Integrating Indigenous Knowhow for Global Flourishing

September 11-15, 2016 | University of Notre Dame

Sunday September 11 – 4:00-5:00

History of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi

by Dr. John Low

Sustainable_Wisdom

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Visit to the Olentangy Indian Caverns

Olentangy 4.30.16

On Saturday, April 30th, the AISO – the American Indian studies club at OSUN – group along with other friends and family ventured to the Olentangy Indian Caverns, just north of Columbus. We talked about power and representation; commodification of culture; Indians as tourist attractions and Midwestern kitsch. Wish it had been a bit warmer but it was very thought provoking. The best surprise – the caves themselves were pretty impressive.

Cave Olentangy 4.30.16

Octagon Earthworks Open House, April 2016

Octagon 4.17.16

On April 17th, 2016 the Newark Earthworks Center (NEC) hosted an open house at the Octagon earthworks in Newark. About 15 folks from the student American Indian studies club (AISO), students from my classes, family and friends, along with many members of the community and guests joined us for one of several wonderful tours led by Dr. Richard Shiels -former head of the NEC and now emeritas in the Department of History here at OSU-Newark. The weather was most cooperative and the tour was very engaging. On Observatory Mound some of the students laid down tobacco in thanks to Nokmeskignan (Grandmother Earth).

Seminary Co-op Bookstore in Chicago and the Trickster Art Gallery in Schaumburg on Saturday, May 21, 2016

Links:

John N. Low discusses Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago.

RSVP HERE

Coming to Trickster May 21st, John N. Low will be reading from and discussing his recent book ‘Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi & the City of Chicago’. 

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Reading & discussion from Imprints at Notre Dame on March 16th & Southwestern Michigan College on March 17th

A reading & discussion from  Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians & the City of Chicago on Wednesday, March 16th, 5:00 to 6:00 PM, 108A Riley Hall, University of Notre Dame

John Low Poster

Notre Dame Poster (pdf)

Thursday, March 17, at Southwestern Michigan College’s Dowagiac campus.

At 2 p.m. in the theater of the Dale A. Lyons Building there will be a Pokagon Band art reception, book signing and academic speaker series presentation by John Low.

New Publication – Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago

Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago by John N. Low

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians has been a part of Chicago since its founding. In very public expressions of indigeneity, they have refused to hide in plain sight or assimilate. Instead, throughout the city’s history, the Pokagon Potawatomi Indians have openly and aggressively expressed their refusal to be marginalized or forgotten—and in doing so, they have contributed to the fabric and history of the city.

Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago examines the ways some Pokagon Potawatomi tribal members have maintained a distinct Native identity, their rejection of assimilation into the mainstream, and their desire for inclusion in the larger contemporary society without forfeiting their “Indianness.” Mindful that contact is never a one-way street, Low also examines the ways in which experiences in Chicago have influenced the Pokagon Potawatomi. Imprints continues the recent scholarship on the urban Indian experience before as well as after World War II.

Subjects: Law | Regional Studies | Native American Studies

Publication Date: February 1st, 2016

328 pages| 6 in x 9 in

Michigan State University Press

Early Praise

“Written in engaging prose by a Pokagon Potawatomi tribal intellectual and activist, John N. Low’s Imprints will forever change the way you think of Chicago. This is not only a sophisticated narrative of the inextricable relations of Native peoples to historical and contemporary urban spaces but also the story of a stubborn tribe who insisted on making and maintaining places for themselves all around their southern Lake Michigan homeland.”
Brian Klopotek, author of Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities

“Every American city is built on Indian land and today most Native American people live in urban places, yet urban Indigenous histories remain largely hidden. John N. Low’s work is a corrective to this, showing us that Chicago has a rich Potawatomi past—and present. From cultural persistence to political activism, the Potawatomi have left a mark on the city that, after reading Imprints, will be almost impossible to forget.”
Coll Thrush, author of Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago on Amazon.com