“The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia” at the Ohio State University – Newark.

It was my honor to co-curate with Marcus Boroughs an exhibit presenting the aesthetic beauty of tapa/ngatu weavings with block printed art reflecting iconic imagery of Oceania. It is quickly obvious that these artistic creations take a community to construct. A sense of connection, tradition, and pride fills the LeFevre Gallery at the Newark campus. The exhibit is free and open to the public until May 1, 2018.

“The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia” comprises original artwork, traditional tapa (beaten bark cloth), photography, film, and ephemera. Exhibition content focuses on artists Dame Robin White (New Zealand) and Ruha Fifita (Tonga), their process and practice in Polynesia.  Collaborating with communities of indigenous women, the artists use traditional methods to produce tapa while also incorporating innovation and contemporary narratives related to the history of Polynesian communities.” (From the prospectus.)

Maori Exhibit BrochureJ

NU-NAISA commemorates the 153rd Sand Creek Massacre anniversary (Northwestern University)

NAISA commemorates the 153rd Sand Creek Massacre anniversary

Was an invited speaker to this amazing event. Story linked above.

Without Native Americans, Would We Have Chicago As We Know It? (WBEZ Story)

Without Native Americans, Would We Have Chicago As We Know It?

Names like DuSable, Marquette, and Joliet are cited in the history books. But it was Native Americans who first set the foundation for Chicago to develop into a major Midwestern metropolis.

I was recently interviewed for this great story (audio and text linked above) on Native contributions to the city of Chicago.

chicago_1820_onwhite-mr_jluhltv Between 1790 and 1830, Europeans and Americans, and their Native American spouses, established a small trading community at the mouth of the Chicago river. (Courtesy Library of Congress)

Meet the Author, John Low, Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians at the Newberry Library, Chicago December 7th

Header-Flyer-Low-Imprints

Thursday, December 7, 2017

6 to 7:30 pm

Ruggles Hall

Free and open to the public. Registration required.

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians has been a part of Chicago since its founding. In very public expressions of indigeneity, they have refused to hide in plain sight or assimilate. Instead, throughout the city’s history, the Pokagon Potawatomi Indians have openly and aggressively expressed their refusal to be marginalized or forgotten—and in doing so, they have contributed to the fabric and history of the city.

Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago examines the ways some Pokagon Potawatomi tribal members have maintained a distinct Native identity, their rejection of assimilation into the mainstream, and their desire for inclusion in the larger contemporary society without forfeiting their “Indianness.” Mindful that contact is never a one-way street, Dr. Low also examines the ways in which experiences in Chicago have influenced the Pokagon Potawatomi. Imprints continues the recent scholarship on the urban Indian experience before as well as after World War II.

After his talk, Dr. Low will sign copies of the book. Imprints will be available in the Newberry Bookstore; your purchase helps to support the Newberry Library and this program’s featured author.

Download a PDF flyer for this event to post and distribute.

John N. Low (Pokagon Potawatomi) is Assistant Professor of Comparative Studies at the Ohio State University Newark, where his research and teaching encompass many aspects of American Indian histories, literatures, and cultures. He has previously served as Executive Director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, as a member of the Advisory Committee for the Indians of the Midwest Project at the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry Library, and on the State of Ohio Cemetery Law Task Force. He continues to serve as a member of his tribe’s Traditions & Repatriation Committee.

AIQ Review of Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago by John N. Low

AIQ 41.3_cover.indd

Reviewed Work: Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the City of Chicago by John N. Low
Review by: Robert E. Walls (Notre Dame)
American Indian Quarterly
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Summer 2017), pp. 292-294
Published by: University of Nebraska Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5250/amerindiquar.41.3.0292
Page Count: 3

3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner, Northwestern University, May 7th, 2017

Northwestern University’s Multicultural Student Affairs, in partnership with the Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, has invited me to the 3rd Annual Native American and Indigenous Community Dinner on Sunday, May 7th, from 5pm-7pm. As a founding advisor and inspiration for the creation of NAISA. the student Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance, I have been asked to speak briefly at the celebration. The event will be located on the Evanston campus in Scott Hall’s Guild Lounge, 601 University Place.

SP17_NU_3rd Annual Native Community Dinner_flyer

Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium Friday, March 31, 2017

The Ball State University Anthropology Student Symposium held Friday, March 31, 2017: Muncie, Indiana.

I was honored to provide a keynote address and was most impressed with the quality of student scholarship at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at BSU! Thank you again to everyone who I had the pleasure to meet at the daylong event!

Lowflyer.BSU

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